Can I improve my memory with computer software?

I am frequently asked this question.  Even my fellow professionals debate this issue. I have decided to dedicate my first Moving Ahead blog entry to this topic

In my opinion computer games can be a helpful addition to treatment by focusing on practicing specific skills. So while you typically get better at a specific game, you are not necessarily improving overall function. That’s not always a bad thing – for some folks it is a good starting point, but it is not a complete solution by any means.

For optimum success your treatment should be specific to your unique needs.  The reality is that each individual learns differently.

While there are lots of options, I will only list a few today.  First, I do not wish to confuse anyone by listing too many choices.

Second, if you are aware of the underlying reason why you are playing a game, you will more likely use this skill in your daily routine.  You will find for every game listed below, the deficits this activity is targeting.

I will suggest a few games at a time; I will update my recommendations on a regular basis via email (hard copies available if requested) and by blog postings. 

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9 Things NOT to say to someone with a brain injury by Marie Rowland PhD

This is an excellent article by  .

If you live with or know a person who suffered a head injury- you ought to read this article.   Rowland does a remarkable job of conveying the way people with head injuries feel. 

Brain injury is confusing to people who don’t have one. It’s natural to want to say something, to voice an opinion or offer advice, even when we don’t understand.

And when you care for a loved one with a brain injury, it’s easy to get burnt out and say things out of frustration.

Here are a few things you might find yourself saying that are probably not helpful:
9 things NOT to say to someone with a brain injury

1. You seem fine to me.

The invisible signs of a brain injury—memory and concentration problems, fatigue, insomnia, chronic pain, depression, or anxiety—these are sometimes more difficult to live with than visible disabilities. Research shows that having just a scar on the head can help a person with a brain injury feel validated and better understood. Your loved one may look normal, but shrugging off the invisible signs of brain injury is belittling. Consider this: a memory problem can be much more disabling than a limp.

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$100 Million dollars allotted for finding better treatments for PTSD and TBI

Battling PTSD and TBI

By Mark Thompson  | @MarkThompson_DC | September 11, 2012

 One day after 9/11 the government announced that it  is providing $100 million to help understand PTSD and TBI.

“PTSD and mTBI are two of the most devastating injuries suffered by our  warfighters in Iraq and Afghanistan,”

 

Read more: http://nation.time.com/2012/09/11/battling-ptsd-and-tbi/#ixzz29llnRapf

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SANDY THE TBI

“The Monster storm‘s devastation was beyond catastrophic…”

“ The worst damage we have ever seen”

I’ve always assumed that I live in one of the most resilient cities in the world.  Yet today, practically everyone I know is shaken by the power of Sandy.   It is quite a surreal experience, resembling a Hollywood Movie with costly and high tech digital effects.

In this post, I am going to link the devastation of the storm with that of a brain injury.  Why?

The answer is simple.  My goal is to help people better understand what everyday life is like for an individual after a TBI.

If you know someone who has a brain injury- PLEASE READ THIS POST.

“I’m tired of people making stupid comments, denying the seriousness and permanence of my condition”…

“They see me dressed up and think all my problems have disappeared…”

Almost every individual who suffers a brain injury feels misunderstood.  As a result, they often isolate themselves from their loved ones.

It is very difficult for most people to truly grasp what living with a head injury is like.  I am hoping this post will help you understand TBI a little better.  Support from friends, family, and professionals is crucial for every person, especially somebody with a TBI.>> Read more

The Story of Mark- In Honor of Veterans Day

Hearing loss the most prevalent injury among returning veterans

By Bill Briggs, NBC News contributor

After a decade of war, America is well schooled on post-traumatic stress, lost limbs and traumatic brain injury, but the most common injury sustained by U.S. troops is literally a silent wound: hearing loss.

Mark Brogan, a retired Army captain, can speak quite personally about almost all of those examples of combat carnage – he suffered a brain injury, a spinal injury and a nearly severed right arm when a suicide bomber on foot detonated his weapon near Brogan six year ago in Iraq.

Mark Brogan sustained a spinal injury, a brain injury, a nearly severed arm – and severe hearing loss – when a suicide bomber blew himself up not far from Brogan in Iraq six years ago.

What does Brogan, 32, consider the worst of the physical trauma? “Hearing loss and the brain injury,” he said from his home in Knoxville, Tenn. He has “profound unusable hearing” in his right ear and severe hearing loss in his left, he said, along with constant ringing, or tinnitus, in his ears.

After the insurgent’s bomb killed a soldier just behind Brogan – along with the person who was wearing the device – other U.S.

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